Je m'appelle Samar Saleh je suis une infirmière licenciee, et je suis une ancienne membre dans la Croix Rouge libanaise pendant 6 ans, et j'ai travailler dans plusieurs hôpitaux libanais et dans les plupart sévices présentes dans les hôpitaux. J'ai une expérience parfaite, et j'aime beaucoup le travail en communauté, ça me donne le courage et en plus j'aime le travail dans autres pays et surtout les pays ou il ya des guerres et les pays qui ont besoin des aides médicaux, sociaux et plusieurs.  [Phrase cut by Admin]

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Experienced war and conflicts in Afghanistan, migrated to Pakistan, Worked for Afghan refugees and tried to survive family. After 9/11 Repatriated to Afghanistan, worked for International NGO then Government. After 10 years of insecurity and corruption challenges once more migrated to Europe and been faced new challenges ahead. Want to help people in need everywhere in the world, have a big desire to work voluntarily for human being. 

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I am a medical student and have been volunteering for Patients' Welfare Association (PWA) for the past 5 years. The organization has been run purely by volunteer students of Dow Medical College, Karachi since 1979, aiming to provide free of charge basic health-care facilities to the poverty stricken patients visiting Civil Hospital Karachi, a public sector tertiary care hospital. Through its Pharmacy, Blood Bank, Thalassemia Day-Care Centre, Diagnostic Lab, TB Clinic and Follow Up Clinics, PWA serves more than a hundred thousand patients each year, setting an excellent example of volunteerism. I love volunteering for this organization because its the best I can do to spend my free time. The feeling of satisfaction I get after observing that a little effort of mine brings smiles on suffering faces is the driving force. And the hundreds of volunteers whom I see serving at PWA are a source of immense inspiration. No doubt, together we can make a difference! Saqib Bakhshi,
Volunteer at Patients' Welfare Association,
Civil Hospital Karachi,
Karachi, Pakistan.

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A week ago I watched a pregnant woman on one of our local channels (ntv uganda) who had gone to the hospital to give birth. Irresponsible enough, the doctors failed to work on the patient who was experiencing a lot of pain throughout her body claiming that she should first pay shs 250000 (100 usd). This was really bad to the mothers of the countries all over the world. Good enough the doctors were arrested the next day but this showed that our people dont really care about the lives of other people. So from that day I vowed to volunteer some services at some health centers on weekends to improve life.

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I have worked in the Development Field for about 20 years and in the HIV/AIDS Field for about 15 years. Now I am willing to volunteer to work for the people in need of in India or in any one of the Asian countries where there is a need. I can give counseling to the people living with HIV/AIDS. I can formulate Project Proposal, plan for it, implement it, evaluate it and send final reports. I can plan for a training program and give training in the field of Development or HIV/AIDS.  Thank you

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In my early years of work, I had to be transferred from where I was working in an urban town to a village area. It happened during the rainy season when the road is not so good and most of the journey is either on foot, horse bag or on Lorries if available. The day was one of those rainy days and the car I boarded Had to drop me at the entrance of the village where I was suppose to go and work, there, I knew no person and little did I know that the health center I was suppose to go and work was mile away from where the car drop me. The area was French speaking zone whereas I am an English speaker. I had to ask if they where people who could speak English and the people knew that I was not a French speaker and so they directed me to a home where I met with English speakers.
Fortunately for me, the host knew me and was surprised to see me in that area and asked where I was going, and I told her about the health center and she told me that it was another 1 day journey from where I was. So I had to spent the night with them and prepare for the journey next day. So after dinner, my host told me she will be going to the neighboring quarter where a woman had been in laboring for two days, so I asked if I could follow her to see the woman and she accepted and we went there together. Typical in a village setting is that if a situation like that happen every elderly woman will have to come and stay them until matters are cleared before they can go back to their respective homes. I told my host to tell the husband of the woman in labor that I will like to see the woman and know how the situation is and advice on what to do. That was done and I went in to the woman in labor.
After examination, I notice that she was a pregravider and the labor she was having was a false contraction and that labor has just began because the cervix was about 6cc dilated and that she will be birth normally within the next few hours and so council her and we waited for the labor to progress gradually. When the dilation was full, I asked my host to get back to the house and bring my emergency bag where I had some medicine for any eventuality. In about four hours, the woman put to birth a girl at full term with good Apgar. Fortunately, they was no eventuality And I when back to my host house to sleep. I got up early the next morning by my host who told me that the chief of the village has heard of my story and one to see me in the palace. I when they and realized that the chief was sick and was from the hospital with some drugs to be administered. I helped him administered his drugs and he told me how they are some missionaries who wanted to help his area with a health care but they didn’t have any nurse to run the health care unit for them. He asked me if I could be of help to their village. It was not in my position to decide because I have a board of management. He had to see in the necessary arrangement with the management and It was agreed that I stay they with the missionaries and create a health unit where emergency cases where handled and serious cases where transferred to the district medical hospital. The unit was opened by the district medical doctor in charge of that area at that time. The health unit was running successfully and we had to train other ward aiders to help because the work load was much. As of now, the health unit has a very large plot with a building erected and a well loaded pharmacy.

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Je suis diplôme en Gestion de projet et actuellement j’étudie la gestion des Affaires. Je suis Secouriste Volontaire de la Croix-Rouge Haïtienne depuis 2008 et en même temps volontaire/membre du comité local de la Commune de Carrefour pour cette même institution.
Malgré le fait que ma disponibilité est tres limitée, je ne ménage jamais mes efforts et a me porter volontaire dans les différentes actions de la CRH.
Et cela ne m’empêche pas a continuer a chercher d'autres moyens et institutions œuvrant dans le domaine du volontariat, pour offrir ma participation.
Avant j'aimais le volontariat, puisque c'est le moyen le plus sur d’être utile a ses proches en étant convaincu que le seul salaire est la satisfaction des bénéficiaires, mais c'est avec le tremblement de terre du 12 janvier 2010 qu'avait connu mon pays, que j'ai vu le miracle du volontariat et de la solidarité lorsque j'ai vu des jeunes et adultes venus de partout, au services de mes frères et sœurs d’Haïti.
Soyons fiers d’être Volontaires.

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I'm volunteering with a Ugandan NGO called the Kiyita Family Alliance for Development (KIFAD) for 3 months. KIFAD works to assist those in the the Wakiso community who are infected or affected by HIV/AIDS. I'm using skills I've taken from internships and my education in the UK to assist KIFAD with finding new sources of funding, organising large scale testing events and improving current systems that are in place which support the NGO's client base. I hope that my work will help to support KIFAD both during and after I have completed my placement.
Jasmine Wakeel

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Nihon Hospital Volunteer Association Logo

Nihon Hospital Volunteer Association is a non-profit organization that contributes to social welfare in Japan through the support and promotion of hospital volunteers and hospital volunteering organizations which offer comfort to the people visiting hospitals. Nihon Hospital volunteer Association is a member of NNOPV (National Network Organizations Promoting Volunteerism in Japan).

 

 

Nihon Hospital Volunteer Association supports hospital volunteers and organizations by providing them with information, consultations, training courses and lectures, with 216 volunteer groups registered and approximately 13,000 hospital volunteers serving through those organizations in Japan.

Hospital Volunteers

 

 

“Hospital Volunteers” provide hospitals and patients with services to outpatients such as assistance to patients with wheel chairs and translation services. For inpatients, they assist with hospitalization procedures, providing pediatric ward with services such as playing with inpatient children and providing tutorials, assisting to serve meals to the patients, washing and cleaning, counseling, etc.

 

They also offer handy-crafting services such as weaving, repairing, making sanitary items, among others, and assisting to organize events at the hospital.

“ Scratch The Back “ One shivering late cold winter, a stranger curiously travelled to the highlands of TIBET --- her mission: to extend Help to Traditional doctors and nurses in the Land she calls since childhood – “ The Lost Horizon. “
Buddhist Monks bestowed the stranger [a Filipina Mission Doctor], with a modest accommodation, that she refers to as acceptable. It never occurred to her, that late winter would be as low as -15°C. Then came one late evening, one could sense the chilling whiff from the bare windows, three Tibetan men, panting to reach up the stairs of the clinic accommodation --- one said, a Primigravida woman on delayed labor needed HELP! The Rescue team, composed of Traditional doctors, nurses, Tibetan language translator and the stranger audaciously drove off to far-away Nomad’s home. On their way by road uphill, their tiny van, chased by huge, lustrous long-haired wild dogs – Rescue team kept their calm! Further uphill, a throng of beautiful, vivid multi-colored stallions captured their gazes. What a Beautiful site to see on a full moonlit winter night with those effervescent , twinkling stars on the sky, brightly lit an isolated Nomad’s home in a “tent”, surrounded by a number of big, dozy “Yaks” lying down on cold, glistening snow-white ground. The stranger rushed to the rescue and firmly said: Induce Labor now! It never bothered to them, that only a small burner lit the entire tent. About two past midnight, five hours later, with the stranger’s two strong hands, a huge Baby boy was pulled out. Baby boy came out “still”, with no cry nor motion --- the stranger yelled to everyone: Scratch the Back!!! All blank stares, their eyes gaping at her – No response. “Panicky” Tibetan language translator was nowhere to be found! In seconds, the stranger firmly grasped the baby on one gloved hand, then the other gloved hand scratched the Baby’s back --- cold, pale Baby boy broke out in a loud agitated cry and All smiles – EveryOne did!
Since then, with their first ever experience on Induce labor and delivery, all Traditional doctors and nurses kept in their minds the Stranger’s call – “ Scratch the Back. “ From Lucy de la Cruz.
Medical Officer
MONUSCO, DRC

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