I believe that poverty can be alleviated if we work together closely and working towards empowerment, capacity building and sharing of resources to those marginalized, living in abject poverty. For 7 years, I did volunteer work in Northern Samar, Philippines. I worked with the SHIFT Foundation. We did a lot of capability building programs, leadership trainings, scholarship programs, community organizing, alternative health care education, voters' education, disaster preparedness, human rights education and peace and justice advocacy. We worked with stakeholders from different sectors.

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It is now observed that most African countries President could not delivered what their Electionianry promises after voting them to power,rather they subjected to the grip of governance with high fixed of budget allocation to their families and left the populace with nothing rather hunger and poverty become the issue of the day. As long the issue of hunger and poverty created in these region, I am appealling to our African leaders to respect the rule of Law as to implement full democracy not FAMILY democracy as to provide foods for ALL. We are to ensure that democracy is not for hunger or poverty rather to draw governance close to the people,then why poverty and Hunger; because of mismanagement of our funds therefore we are to rise and fight for our FOOD AND HUNGER.

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the 4P's of the DSWD is a social action of the government to promote quality life and living condition of the targeted sector in our poor Filipino urban and rural communities. The DSWD as my employer and me as the frontliner is always trying our best to reach the mandate to possibly quantify and assure the sector be given equal opportunities a human rights for them to live a dignified life above all.

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After volunteering with street children in several Latin American locations, such as Santo Domingo, Ecuador, La Paz, Bolivia and Valença, Brazil, I started helping as a logistician for Medici per i Diritti Umani (MEDU), an NGO operating in the Public Health sector that supports primarily migrants, refugees and homeless in my home city, Rome. I am currently also trying to convince all my friends and family to switch to a soustainable life conduct.

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925 million hungry people in 2010 No one really knows how many people are malnourished. The statistic most frequently cited is that of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, which measures 'undernutrition'. The FAO did not publish an estimate in its most recent publication, 'The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2011' as it is undertaking a major revision of how it estimates food insecurity (FAO 2011 p. 10). The 2010 estimate, the most recent, says that 925 million people were undernourished in 2010 (FAO 2010). As the figure below shows, the number of hungry people has increased since 1995-97.. The increase has been due to three factors: 1) neglect of agriculture relevant to very poor people by governments and international agencies; 2) the current worldwide economic crisis, and 3) the significant increase of food prices in the last several years which has been devastating to those with only a few dollars a day to spend. 925 million people is 13.6 percent of the estimated world population of 6.8 billion. Nearly all of the undernourished are in developing countries. Number of hungry people, 1969-2010 Source: FAO In round numbers there are 7 billion people in the world. Thus, with an estimated 925 million hungry people in the world, 13.1 percent, or almost 1 in 7 people are hungry. The FAO estimate is based on statistical aggregates. The FAO first estimates the total food supply of a country and derives the average per capita daily food intake from that. The distribution of average food intake for people in the country is then estimated from surveys measuring food expenditure. Using this information, and minimum food energy requirements, FAO estimates how many people are likely to receive such a low level of food intake that they are undernourished.3 Undernutrition is a relatively new concept, but is increasingly used. It should be taken as similar to malnutrition. (It should be said as an aside, that the idea of undernourishment, its relationship to malnutrition, and the reasons for its emergence as a concept is not clear to Hunger Notes.) Children are the most visible victims of undernutrition. Children who are poorly nourished suffer up to 160 days of illness each year. Poor nutrition plays a role in at least half of the 10.9 million child deaths each year--five million deaths. Undernutrition magnifies the effect of every disease, including measles and malaria. The estimated proportions of deaths in which undernutrition is an underlying cause are roughly similar for diarrhea (61%), malaria (57%), pneumonia (52%), and measles (45%) (Black 2003, Bryce 2005). Malnutrition can also be caused by diseases, such as the diseases that cause diarrhea, by reducing the body's ability to convert food into usable nutrients. According to the most recent estimate that Hunger Notes could find, malnutrition, as measured by stunting, affects 32.5 percent of children in developing countries--one of three (de Onis 2000). Geographically, more than 70 percent of malnourished children live in Asia, 26 percent in Africa and 4 percent in Latin America and the Caribbean. In many cases, their plight began even before birth with a malnourished mother. Under-nutrition among pregnant women in developing countries leads to 1 out of 6 infants born with low birth weight. This is not only a risk factor for neonatal deaths, but also causes learning disabilities, mental, retardation, poor health, blindness and premature death. Take a three-question hunger quiz on this section Does the world produce enough food to feed everyone? The world produces enough food to feed everyone. World agriculture produces 17 percent more calories per person today than it did 30 years ago, despite a 70 percent population increase. This is enough to provide everyone in the world with at least 2,720 kilocalories (kcal) per person per day according to the most recent estimate that we could find.(FAO 2002, p.9). The principal problem is that many people in the world do not have sufficient land to grow, or income to purchase, enough food. What are the causes of hunger? What are the causes of hunger is a fundamental question, with varied answers. Poverty is the principal cause of hunger. The causes of poverty include poor people's lack of resources, an extremely unequal income distribution in the world and within specific countries, conflict, and hunger itself. As of 2008 (2005 statistics), the World Bank has estimated that there were an estimated 1,345 million poor people in developing countries who live on $1.25 a day or less.3 This compares to the later FAO estimate of 1.02 billion undernourished people. Extreme poverty remains an alarming problem in the world’s developing regions, despite some progress that reduced "dollar--now $1.25-- a day" poverty from (an estimated) 1900 million people in 1981, a reduction of 29 percent over the period. Progress in poverty reduction has been concentrated in Asia, and especially, East Asia, with the major improvement occurring in China. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the number of people in extreme poverty has increased. The statement that 'poverty is the principal cause of hunger' is, though correct, unsatisfying. Why then are (so many) people poor? The next section summarizes Hunger Notes answer. Harmful economic systems are the principal cause of poverty and hunger. Hunger Notes believes that the principal underlying cause of poverty and hunger is the ordinary operation of the economic and political systems in the world. Essentially control over resources and income is based on military, political and economic power that typically ends up in the hands of a minority, who live well, while those at the bottom barely survive, if they do. We have described the operation of this system in more detail in our special section on Harmful economic systems. Conflict as a cause of hunger and poverty. At the end of 2005, the global number of refugees was at its lowest level in almost a quarter of a century. Despite some large-scale repatriation movements, the last three years have witnessed a significant increase in refugee numbers, due primarily to the violence taking place in Iraq and Somalia. By the end of 2008, the total number of refugees under UNHCR’s mandate exceeded 10 million. The number of conflict-induced internally displaced persons (IDPs) reached some 26 million worldwide at the end of the year . Providing exact figures on the number of stateless people is extremely difficult But, important, (relatively) visible though it is, and anguishing for those involved conflict is less important as poverty (and its causes) as a cause of hunger. (Using the statistics above 1.02 billion people suffer from chronic hunger while 36 million people are displaced [UNHCR 2008]) Hunger is also a cause of poverty, and thus of hunger. By causing poor health, low levels of energy, and even mental impairment, hunger can lead to even greater poverty by reducing people's ability to work and learn, thus leading to even greater hunger. Climate change Climate change is increasingly viewed as a current and future cause of hunger and poverty. Increasing drought, flooding, and changing climatic patterns requiring a shift in crops and farming practices that may not be easily accomplished are three key issues. See the Hunger Notes special report: Hunger, the environment, and climate change for further information, especially articles in the section: Climate change, global warming and the effect on poor people such as Global warming causes 300,000 deaths a year, study says and Could food shortages bring down civilization? Progress in reducing the number of hungry people The target set at the 1996 World Food Summit was to halve the number of undernourished people by 2015 from their number in 1990-92. (FAO uses three year averages in its calculation of undernourished people.) The (estimated) number of undernourished people in developing countries was 824 million in 1990-92. In 2010, the number had climbed to 925 million people. The WFS goal is a global goal adopted by the nations of the world; the present outcome indicates how marginal the efforts were in face of the real need. So, overall, the world is not making progress toward the world food summit goal, although there has been progress in Asia, and in Latin America and the Caribbean. Number of children in the world
2.2 billion
Number in poverty
1 billion (every second child)
Shelter, safe water and health
For the 1.9 billion children from the developing world, there are: 640 million without adequate shelter (1 in 3)
400 million with no access to safe water (1 in 5)
270 million with no access to health services (1 in 7)
Children out of education worldwide
121 million
Survival for children
Worldwide, 10.6 million died in 2003 before they reached the age of 5 (same as children population in France, Germany, Greece and Italy)
1.4 million die each year from lack of access to safe drinking water and adequate sanitation
Health of children
Worldwide, 2.2 million children die each year because they are not immunized
15 million children orphaned due to HIV/AIDS (similar to the total children population in Germany or United Kingdom)
This information was taken from several resources from different countries.
Thank you
Vladimir Elosequis.

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Peter Ghombo is a monitoring and evaluation specialist in Sierra Leone.
2005-2007:Peter, monitoring and evalaution officer promoting food access right and community mobilisation project in the south and northern Sierra Leone, worked with 300 farmer field schools, and 120 exlusive women groups for the production of rice, cassava, groundnut, with this project we were able to empowered vulnerable farmers establihed seed banks, increase production, and livelihoods. 2010-date , Peter M&E coordinator with the sustainable nutrition and livelihood programme Sierra Leone, Peter worked to help rural farmers organise in farmer field schools, after which graduate to mass producer and marketing associations,help youths attend short vocational skills training, after training graduate to skills groups and trade association for groups businesses. all these are contributing to the betterment of lives of rural vulnerable people.
2008-2010 : Monitoring and Evaluation officer with the used of stabex transfers project, implemted in the eastern region in Sierra Leone, Peter contributed in the rehabilitation, improve processing of cocao and coffee foe export to the world market with small holders ,contributed in the establishment of internal control sysytems for fairtrade and organic certifications for small holders farmers of cocoa and coffee, these helped farmers to increase income receive from cocoa and coffee with premiums received in addition to the world market for conventional cocoa and coffee.heir cocoa and coffee through awareness on the world market price for cocoa, be the end of the two years project with the final evalaution, atleast 20% increase in income was recored for farmers in the project areas when compared to other producers of cocoa and coffee in non project locations. over ten thoudsand households benefited from the project.
farmer gained additional revenue from the sale of t

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When I was in college me and my friend used to cook porridge and noodles and packed in them in plastics to be given to street children that we met outside the Cathedral. This serves us our Sunday gift giving activity for quite sometime.

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The past few days I was implementing a seed fair project to help needy farmers in South Sudan have access to field crops seed. It was sad to see even basic agriultural input including seed is a problem to significant number of people here. Without government leaders committment and development agencies concerted effort, elimination of poverty seem distant.

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My name is Richard Obonyo, a resident of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. I participate, from time to time, in the local community by extending a helping hand to the less advantaged by helping provide basic needs such food to help reduce hunger and often provide a listening ear and counselling to help individuals rediscover themselves and tackle psycho-social problems so as to continue developing themselves to their full potential and in that way, contribute to world peace and development. I encourage everyone (my conviction is that everyone has some talent) to contribute to world peace and development by donating time and sharing their skills whenever and wherever possible.

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I am 27 year old girl and after a master in international relations, winter and summer school concerning Humanitarian emergency and several internship at HQ levels, I finally got a stage on the field in Mauritania. I am here as volunteers for an NGO to work to different projects concerning the two humanitarian crisis that this country is facing: Malian refugees in the M'Bera camp and the drought crisis. I strongly looked for this opportunity in order to understand and discover the world of "humanitarian". Since the beginning of this experience I understood that it is really not easy to work in emergency contexts: you are far from your country, family friends, habits, your are inside a new country with its rules and customs that sometimes are hard to understand, moreover most of the time for security issue your autonomy is strongly limited. Notwithstanding, when you see the faces of refugees or vulnerable people when you heard their stories you understand that all the efforts that you made are paid off. Besides, you also understand that the first thing that you learned during the first day of political science: "nobody does anything for nothing", works really well also in this sector. Thereby, some humanitarian crisis are much more financed than others, agencies are fighting in order to get much power and NGOs compete with each other. To sum, also in this context policy plays a strong role and instead of a great cooperation most of the time is the competitive that is spread. However, fortunately, it is also full of really nice-skilled people who really believe in what they are doing and they work hard in order to make a difference.

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