Dear Sir/Madam
My name is Mugerwa Muzamil, Am 28 years old and currently am volunteering in the brain gain project at Butabika national refferal Mental Health Hospital in Uganda as a peer support worker. This is a new initiative to help fellow service users through a journey towards recovery by providing support, counselling so that they gain meaning back in their lives. its the first in Africa and we under went training in communication skills, recovery action plan in March and May. This is a collaboration between Heartsounds a CBO which links East London and Ugandan service users and Butabika Hospital for better mental health. peer support workers are experts through experience. Its not been easy as me as a peer support worker am vulnerable too. But we work through thin and thick so that our fellow service users live a productive life again. Some of the service users are violent but we have to take them on board to a journey through recovery.
We are very optismitic that this is going to change communities perception af mental health, and change Uganda, Africa and the World.Thanks
Mugerwa Muzamil
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Peer support worker at Heart
sounds.
www.heartsounds.ning.com

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#actioncounts I have been working as a Health worker for more than 30 years in different nursing areas, in peace and war times. Let me give you one of my experiences: - In 1986, I was allocated in one clinic in Sahel (Ela Ababu) o village located in lowlands of Eritrea. At that time there was drought followed by famine. There was a new camp of 90 families without health worker with a distance of 30 minutes walking to reach them from my clinic. At that time I was asked by ERA (Eritrean Relief Association) to provide them health care and to assess those who were suffering with malnutrition and provide them nutritious foods /supplements/ and supportive medicines like vitamins and minerals. Since I had empathy towards those people especially those vulnerable groups such as children, pregnant and lactating mothers, even though I was busy with my regular tasks, I voluntary received the responsibility. I was checking them twice a day and providing prompt service for a year. It was hard to fulfill that extra task with that hot climate and shortage of health workers (only 2 H.Workers were allocated under me) and shortage/lack of some resources, but we could managed them and handled properly and satisfactory with an average of 14-16 hours working time per a day. We in collaboration with ERA members had used a lot of effort and the outcome was evaluated as effective and efficient. So to be a nurse you need DEVOTION and DEDICATION even at the time of stressful situation.
#actioncounts
For the future, I volunteered in providing quality health care with compassion, in respect for life, dignity and rights of man, unrestricted by consideration of nationality, age, sex, race, color, politics or social status. My fundamental responsibility as BSc Nurse is to promote health, to prevent illness, to restore health and to alleviate suffering whenever and wherever when UN requested my voluntary contribution for the better future of our planet.
With Regards.
Tekle

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Health Care in danger for Internally Displaced People around the world
On Saturday 8 October 2005, when devastating earthquake hit Pakistan and Kashmir that causes the lives of millions with death, pain, misery and destruction. I was there working with International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in emergency and relief period and World Food Program (WFP) in recovery period. On Tuesday 15 November 2005, I went with the ICRC tem on a trip to camp near Chakwal for assessment to the earthquake victims there. It was around 11 AM when we came across a severely sick mother with a six months baby dying with nutrition and disease on her lap and three other her children laying beside her with the same problem and their father was killed by the earthquake. The mother and her children cannot even move their fingers to protect and cover from the flies gathering on them. There was an MCH only 100 metre distance, unfortunately, the MCH nurses and other staff waiting people to come and seek treatment but they didn’t think about that the people in the camp they cannot even get up to visit to the medical centre. So they need someone who go around and check what is going on. We all shock and cry and immediately took them to the MCH for emergency treatment and requested the camp authority if they can take them to Islamabad for better treatment and they accepted our request and they took the mother and her four children to Islamabad.
After a week, our team and I visited the mother and her children at Hospital in Islamabad. It was sad that the mother lost her six month old baby, however, the rest were survived and at that time the other three children were playing outside of the hospital. The mother came to thank us and hugged each and every one of our team. It was unforgettable experience.
Hassan Ibrahim

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I am a doctor and I provide health care services for the community in my residence that is township level in Mandalay Myanmar. I have been involving voluntarily in Navevan Sukha social warfare activities for nonprofit purpose.

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2 yrs ago, I first climbed the steep slopes of Brgy Lemonda with my Pastor. It was a thrilling adventure, full of excitement and fun. now, 2 yrs later, with constant pounding of rain and relentless mining in the area, the road going to Lemonda instantly became a nightmare. full of crevices and steep cliffs with sharp-edged stones everywhere, going to Lemonda requires deeper kind of love and courage. it doesnt stop us, especially when we reached the Center. Eighteen Families were waiting for us! Eighteen! and some of them were already there as early as 6am. some even walked for atleast 4 hrs just to get there. I cant imagine myself, with that kind of terrain, walking for 4 hrs! and here they are, smiling and waving, anticipating for our return. I cant help but smile, and reach out to them, soaked in mud and sweat from the previous journey. children were too small for their age and too thin, cough and colds were the first I noticed, coughs as old as 2 months. no medicines, no medical check up for the past 6 months. I reached out for the medicines we bought and started handing out medicines to the parents. checked their blood pressure and any signs of medical risks and threats.
at the end of the day, there still so much work that is needed to be done. with limited supplies I cant help but resigned to the fact that for now, that's all we can give. I promised to myself, I must muster my strength to be strong for these people and gather as much help I can get and delivered to them the promised services.
more medicines were needed, health teachings to be taught, services to be given. they need us.
I am John Murphy E. Talibong, RN, nurse without borders.

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Iligan City, known as the industrial city of the south, is home to over 300,000 Iliganons. More than half of it still lives under poverty, that even the basics of their health needs is beyond their capabilities. Many children dies out of hunger, diarrhea and dehydration, all preventable illnesses. These unreached people groups are left behind while the rest of us enjoys the bounty of the land. I want to live, not only to exist. I want to make a difference to this people.

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Working as a nurse under the auspices of “Brit Olam” an Isreali Organization, and the Helping Hands Medical Fellowship in the district of Kiboga, Uganda, Africa. The work involved Health Education to high schools, teaching a “village health team" course to Ugandan community workers, working in the local district hospital and in rural outreach clinics.
The conditions under which we worked were quite harsh (most of the time no electriciy or running water), but looking around us at the local population whose lives were far harsher than ours, we took strength from them and recieved as much or more than we gave.I am sure that I am a different and better person because of this experience and it permeates in my work until today. Eudice Yudelevich
Jerusalem, Israel

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I worked as Volunteer Doctor in Sierra Leone last 2010-2011 under the VSO. I worked as Medical Officer in the Hospital, I do consultation, assist in surgical operation and do daily rounds to the hospital.
The hospital has 1 local doctor when I arrived, thus my presence help the hospital deal with more patients. Eventhough the area has limited electric supply (generator), no water system, no grocery store - the local residents help me to my daily chore. They assist me looking for my food, water and sometimes entertainment area.
The local doctor was focused on administrative and surgical works when I arrived thus I was left to do the consultation and daily rounds. The work was so challenging but very fulfilling. Every day you can see from the people smiles and actions how happy they are - when a doctor give attention to their needs. Local residents said, its there first time to see a doctor working 24 hours in the hospital or always avilable upon a single call from hospital employee. Sierra Leone has 126 doctors that time for 6 Million people, thus health system in the rural system was very poor. A local doctor was to exhausted to work overtime thus a volunteer personnel was great help also for them to unload there work. I was also assigned in Obstetrics area and seeing a Sierra Leonan born every day healthy was my daily vitamins to pursue my worked. Seeing my patients discharged healthy and resume a normal life is emotionally uplifting. A daily routine in the hospital was never been dull but very exciting and enjoyable. Eventhough my stay was short, but the experience I had is a life time to cherished.

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I Muthiah Sivanesan, male had been working as a field protection and relief assistant in United nations organizations at Sri lanka from 2000 - 2010. Immigrate to Canada as a skilled worker in Feb 2010. Presently I am working as a Recreation Program Assistant at St. Paul's L' Amoreaux Community Service and Houseing for seniors. I am working on developing recreation activities for seniors from different communities bythe way promoting healthy living and independent life for them. I organize and operate different regular recration programs like exercise, dance, art & culture, music, edugation and games for them also arrange outings / Trips and special events like entertainment & celebration. I am really enjoying and feel happy while working with them and much intrested to share my experience. Thanks
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More hospitals or health center should to be open to provide good and excellent health care to the poor. Free drugs provisions to the needy and expansion in humanitarian services in areas of poverty striking homes.
I have worked at the health care department for several years and has provide good health care services to kids, adult and the destitute.

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