I work in Dadaab refugee camp with CARE under WASH. Tasks include provision of safe water to the refugees. The population has been overwhelming and Dadaab being the biggest camp in the world,requires a lot of sacrifice. We have always aimed at maintaining a water supply of 17 to 21 liters per capita per day. Other components include the water quality and hygiene protection. We have made a change in a period of over 20 years for the refugees, it is in the refugees faces.

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I volunteer as an admin manager for VIDA a water purification company in Timor Leste, Vida is a struggling organization that is ran by one man, I was fortunate to run into him at a gathering, I told him I was looking for a job, we talked and I got to know about the company, I decided to put in my time while hoping for another opportunity. I volunteer as a admin manager, because I saw the need for clean water in Timor Leste, its been really inspiring being able to give my time for the provision of clean water to the communities in some of the smaller district in the country.
I also was able to train young women in hair dressing skills in Nigeria seeing the usefulness of knowing a trade that can help better ones life without waiting for the government, I started a hair dressing salon that actually helped me pay my tuition fees while studying, I decided to share that knowledge with some young ladies around my neighborhood am happy to say giving my time to train them is one of my greatest achievement because it did help some of them that would have probably ended on the street, but were able to learn the skill and are using it presently as a source of income and its changed their lives and still changing lives, most of them are still passing on the knowledge to others.

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Je me prénomme BAZIGAGA Blandine je suis Rwandaise age de 30 ans. Merci de me donner l’opportunité de vous partager mes actions du volontariat dans le domaine de soins de sante.
Prenons l'exemple de notre pays, il ya une politique de facilitations de soins de sante qu'on appelle: Mutuelle de Sante; pour toute la population surtout que ça aider les plus vulnérables.
Bon, en ce qui me concerne, j'essaye de venir en aide aux plus pauvres en leur payant la contribution mensuelle demandée par le Gouvernement.
Étant donne la vulnérabilité de certaines personnes qui ne peuvent ni régler les frais hospitalier ni avoir de quoi manger, on essaye de leur régler la facture et leur donner a manger, les savons et de quoi se vêtir.
Merci.

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I am an 18 year old American girl who has spent 3 months for the past 3 years volunteering throughout Brasil promoting environmental sustainability: reforestation work in the Atlantic Rainforest, permaculture practices in Bahia and Amazonas, and running an environmental education program providing information on recycling and the benefits of doing so and consequences of not doing so for rural communities throughout the state of Rio de Janeiro. This summer I will be volunteering for bettering health care in Rio de JAneiro, providing health education services, education, and activities for women and children focused on promoting health awareness and understanding the importance of sexual health especially with HIV/ AIDS in a Rio Favela.
My passion for volunteering and shaped my life in many ways, including how I have structured my university education. I am currently working towards my degree with the intention of using everything I learn in the classroom in combination with what I learn outside of the classroom to make the world a better place. Volunteering is the answer to solving or even simply bettering so many issues our world faces and I will dedicate my life to giving as much service to my community as possible as well as promoting the incredible differences volunteering can make to my peers.
I will make a difference.
Thank you,
Kathryn Cherkas

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My initial experience as IUNV Midwife at Malakal County Upper Nile State. By Catherine Makumi-UNFPA

Nothing prepared me for the experience that was ahead of me at Malakal. As plane landed at Malakal Airport, I knew, I had to give my very best.
I arrived at the Malakal Teaching Hospital equipped with the knowledge that, the Maternity wing of the hospital was self sufficient, and my volunteer work might not after all be appreciated.
Immediately, I realized that volunteerism is a powerful means of engaging and leading people in tackling challenges and especially those at Malakal Teaching Hospital. The task ahead was to raise the knowledge of the care givers, this ranged from simple cleanliness to care of mothers and their infants, before, during and after delivery
Malakal Town is the capital of Upper Nile State, and hence the Malakal Teaching Hospital is a referral hospital for all other 12 counties. It is for this reason that, the hospital needs to have a very high level of professionals and professionalism.
The hospital has some of the oldest buildings in the State; some wards need urgent repair or new wards. The SRH structures are old and some areas are very small for caregivers to effectively carry out their procedures, for example the delivery room. Inside the Malakal Teaching Hospital The SRH unit. Malakal Teaching Hospital The delivery room is very small dark, no proper ventilation
And it is poorly constructed
Most of the caregivers at the SRH are Traditional Birth Attendants. According to the South Sudan National Health Facility Mapping, there are only 19 registered midwives and 132 Community midwives. Notwithstanding, the SRH has only 2 qualified Midwives and no Community Midwives to supplement services.
The initial assessment revealed that the facility had most of the necessary equipments and supplies; however, electricity supply is a major setback. For example, a newborn unit that is fully equipped, with 2 new incubators, a resuscitaire, Oxygen concentrators and suction machines is not functional. Although generators are available to generate electricity for this, supply of fuel remains a major challenge.
Immediately, I realized that capacity building was of importance because the midwifery model of care was lacking, for example, the TBAs, delivered babies without proper PPEs and spread of infection was easy
Due to lack of qualified midwives, care of patient is usually compromised and regular coaching and tutoring of the Tradition Birth Attendants is a vital and immediately embarked on it. The priority for the hospital administration is to have community midwives deployed to the hospital for proper and effective services of CEMOC. Language remains a key barrier, though demonstrations take centre stage and they are effective. Translations are often difficult as information is distorted. In the antenatal clinic, mothers sit eagerly for their turn to be attended and have their weight, height and blood pressure checked by the only qualified midwife at the clinic. Her workload is heavy as she further registers the patients in the register that is well kept and then assists the Tradition Birth Attendant to palpate the patients.
The presence of the IUNV midwife brought a smile to the staff at the ANC clinic
Two months into my assignment, I received 8 Community Midwives students from Kajokeji training school located 60miles south of juba and at the border of Uganda. The aim was to give them clinical mentoring and coaching. The two months they stayed at the hospital was also a great influence to the Tradition Birth Attendants and other healthcare providers, which had a firsthand feel of how midwifery model of care should be.
On March 12, 2011, fighting broke out in Malakal throughout the night and day there was heavy shooting. It was new experience for me, getting the 15ks run bag, which I had assumed I will by no means need. The move into the bunker was an experience that left me wondering if all this was real.
The eventual move to Log Base was like a scene on films I had seen and many times I thought about my family. This was both physically and mentally traumatizing. Finally there was need for professional counseling.
On returning to the hospital after almost a month’s break trainings and tutoring resumed at the hospital. At the initial seminar for the Tradition Birth Attendants, I realized that although some could not read or write, they were able to grasp a lot of information and they were hungry for knowledge. Instructions by IUNV Midwife Catherine at a seminar A TBA presenting group work to the class
For TBA’s. Showing how to conduct 2nd stage IUNV Midwife giving a practical session on Neonatal resuscitation Follow up is the key in ensuring that what has been taught is carried out at the unit level.
Apart from many other challenges in the unit. Hospital access is bad during the rainy season (June to October); the roads are impassable due to abundance of mad. This may be a contributing factor to high maternal mortality as women do come to hospitals in time or they do not come at all. This is one of the streets during rainy season, notice small A Street near UNICEF guest house on far end
Vehicles cannot travel in this mad; hence transport is
Difficult at this time During this time most staffs are not able to reach their working station in time, thus leading to insufficient and interrupted care to women. Experience that was a turning point for Caregivers
I arrived on duty one morning and one of the TBA showed me her 3 fingers, and I asked her what was the problem, she was looking so excited, but we could not communicated, the junior doctor came immediately and told me “three”, I asked him what is three, he held my hand and led me to a mother sleeping on the bed. He pointed at the mother and said “three”, I looked and saw the whole baby cot was covered by a sheet, opening I found three cold babies each 1kg had been born the previous night.
They were all baby girls, as I was examining them the pediatrician came and examined them, and said since there was no incubator I had to decide what to do with the babies. I instructed the TBA on what to do, she explained to the mother and we put the babies in kangaroo position. None in the hospital has seen this and all caregivers were coming to see this position. Although one of the babies did not survive, the others were discharged. Follow up is very difficult as the mother did not bring the babies back. Efforts to trace her were fruitless.
The hospital receives many preterm deliveries, and the kangaroo position has helped many babies to survive
My next stage is to nurture the spirit of volunteerism by reaching out to SOS children’s home in Malakal. I will give my time, love, loving touch and companionship to the children. The SOS Children’s Village opened in 2003, consists of ten family houses, where a 100 children can find a new home. There is also the village accommodates the director and others workers’.

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I have volunteered by contributing towards the construction of water spring in my remote kanungu district, Uganda, E. Africa.
This water source serves 20 families and hope this helps them have a better life with less water borne diseases hence improving their livelihood.

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Title: THE IMPACTS OF ANTHROPOGENIC ACTIVITIES ON ATLANTIC AND INDIAN OCEANS IN AFRICA
AUTHOR: BABAGANA ABUBAKAR AFFILIATION: ECOWAS/AFAO
E-Mail: babaganabubakar2002 @yahoo.com SKYPE: babagana.abubakar
TEL: +234 8062220179
PERMANENT ADDRESS: ALHAJI BUKAR KUYA HOUSE, OPPOSSITE ABUROS MOSQUE, FEZZAN WARD, FEZZAN, MAIDUGURI, NIGERIA. Introduction:
Africa is the second largest and most populated continent after Asia. Geographically it is located between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Most of the Africa’s most populated and industrialized cities are located along the coast of the continent facing the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, example of such cities include Casablanca, Dakar, Accra, Lagos, Luanda and Cape town all facing the Atlantic Ocean and cities like East London, Durban, Maputo, Dar-es-salaam and Mogadishu are all facing the Indian Ocean. As a result of the geographical locations of African Coastal Cities plus increase in their population, industries, sea port operations, petroleum exploration activities, trafficking of toxic wastes and improper waste management culture lead to the incessant increase in the pollution of the two oceans.
NATURE OF POLLUTION OF THE ATLANTIC OCEAN i. The petroleum exploration activities going on along the coast of “Gulf of Guinea” region in countries such as Equatorial Guinea, Sao Tome and Principe, Gabon, Nigeria, Angola and others continuously causes oil spillages in the process of drilling, bunkering and discharging of petroleum products in the Atlantic Ocean. Figures 1 A: World Map indicating the location of Gulf of Guinea.
Figures 1 B: The map of Gulf of Guinea in Africa.
The exploration activity in this region is in the form of vicious circle as illustrated below:
The vicious circle of the exploration activity
The problem of pollution in this region will ever remain on the increase because of the economic implication of oil exploration in the sub-region and in the whole World in general.
ii. The incessant degreasing of the Sea Ports “Quay Aprons” along the Coastal cities of Lagos, Duala, Libreville, Luanda, Cape Town etc are continuously polluting the Atlantic Ocean with chemicals which is affecting negatively the Ocean marine biodiversity of the Atlantic Ocean in general.
Figure 2 A: Showing a polluting African sea port.
Figure 2 A: Showing a polluted Ocean Shores.
iii. Local wastes generated from the houses located in the coastal cities are always finding their ways directly or indirectly into the Atlantic Ocean. In fact this explains why plastic containers are always deposited by the Ocean along the African beautiful coastal beaches.
iv) Gas flaring activities in the gulf of guinea region is another source of pollution and even source of canalizing the ongoing climate change across the globe in the region. Because a report released by the renown non-governmental organization on environmental pollution the Netherlands based Climate Justice Programme under the aegis of “friends of the Earth” indicated that the coastal region of Nigeria along accounts for 16 percent of the world’s total flare.
NATURE OF POLLUTION OF THE INDIAN OCEAN
i) Unlike the Atlantic Ocean where petroleum is the major pollutant, the Indian Ocean is polluted by Toxic and or Radioactive waste suspected to have been coming from the developed nations by taking the advantage of the unstable Somaliland political situation as reported by the United Nations Environmental Programme after the Tsunami disaster in December 2004 especially along the coast of Somalia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_Indian_Ocean_earthquake_and_tsunami ). Figure 3: Showing the Eastern part of Africa and Somalia facing the Indian Ocean:
Figure 4: Showing a contaminated container exposed by tsunami on the coast of Somalia.
Figure 5: Showing experts evacuating/cleaning the contaminated coast.
iii. Local wastes generated from the houses located in the coastal cities of Dar-ES-Salaam, Maputo, Djibouti, Mogadishu, East London and Durban among others are also polluting the Indian Ocean by always finding their ways into the Indian Ocean.
PROBLEMS GENERATED AS A RESULT OF THE OCEANS POLLUTION i. Report released by the Netherlands based Climate Justice Programme under the aegis of “friends of the Earth” indicated that the coastal region of Nigeria along accounts for 16 percent of the world’s total flare in view of the above coupled with the increasing oil spillages in the African Gulf of Guinea region resulted in the rapid decline in fish, plankton, shrimps and other sea lives along the Coast of Africa facing the Atlantic Ocean. ii. In the more recent time the revering dwellers living around the Coast of Gulf of Guinea region and Somalia’s Coast have been complaining of increasing cases of child respiratory illness, land degradation, well pollution, infertility and premature death. iii. Geological strata of the Atlantic Ocean are adversely destroyed by the seismographic activities going on around the Gulf of Guinea region and Angola in particular. iv. The general means of livelihood of the revering dwellers are often threaten by the pollution. POSITION OF THE GOVERNMENTS OF AFRICA Apart from the governments of the federal republic of Nigeria, South Africa, Ghana, Senegal and Tanzania that have either established institutes of Oceanography and or Environmental Protection Agencies, the majority of the African governments have shown no signs of checking the menace. POSITION OF THE NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANISATION The Netherlands based Climate Justice and the Nigeria Environmental Rights Action are the only non-governmental organizations out of very many that have shown signs of fighting this incessant increase in ocean pollution in Africa. RECOMMENDATION In view of the above situation I came up with the under-listed suggestions/recommendations: i. International organizations who’s work that are related to Ocean, climate change and Pollution should send their teams of researchers to come and investigate the trend of this menace and proffer a possible lasting solution. ii. The United Nations should use its capacity to educate and convinced the African Union to pass a resolution making it compulsory on all the African Coastal Countries to set up ocean regulatory bodies in their respective countries. iii. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) should assist with her technical know how on how to educate the managements of the various Sea Ports in Africa on how to be degreasing their Quay Aprons without necessarily causing Ocean Pollution. iv. The organization of the petroleum exporting countries (OPEC) should use its capacity to find a way in controlling the incessant oil spillages going on in the African Gulf of Guinea region since many of the Gulf of Guinea Countries are its members. v. The World Health Organization (WHO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and International Maritime Organisation should also jointly send their team of researchers to come and investigate the trend of this pollution especially along the Coast of Somalia and or Gulf of Guinea and proffer a possible lasting solution to the menace before it becomes too late. CONCLUSION The Author cited how the Atlantic and the Indian Oceans are polluted in Africa in relation to petroleum, industrial and Sea Port activities in addition to the Toxic waste Trafficking, however some governments and non-governmental organizations are trying in fighting the menace, but the increasing nature of the pollution of the two Oceans in Africa is calling for more research, assistance and commitments. It was in view of this situation that the author came up with the above listed suggestions/Recommendations, which he believes that if implemented and adopted it will help reduce or stop the pollution otherwise this pollution will ever remain on the increase.

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Consider me as one of the many simple person in this planet. Clean Water is very essential to each and every species surviving. We can live without food but having no clean drinking water is much worse. Well as an ordinary people, we can help by saving and proper utilizing of water for good and I can consider that as a person who volunteers to proper use of water. Joseph A Florendo
Quezon City, Philippines
+63 946 249 8547

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I am Reyhan from Canada. Actually for me nothing is more beautiful than being with children, and people around the world with different culture.. my nature is built for this.. to help them, to be with them, to listen their problems. I was working with children and know how to behave with them. I am such a patient girl and love to help people.
I was also working in Energy ministry in water management department and have had many articles about clean water in poor countries. So I can use my experiences very well in this field. also I am young and learn very well..
I am ready to work as a volunteer and hope to have this chance soon. please let me help people as a responsible person in this world.

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I am Elizabeth Walumbe, a Registered Public Health Nurse/Midwife from Kenya, currently working as a IUNV Midwife with UNFPA in Aweil, Northern Bahr El Ghazal State, South Sudan. Volunteering is a very noble and important undertaking which gets a lot of things accomplished towards bettering people's lives. When I first came across the word volunteering I wondered how people could work as volunteers and still manage their family obligations. During most of my humanitarian work, I observed that UN Volunteers looked happy and contented with their work. I failed to understand them until I joined the IUNV team in October 2011. I was posted to Northern Barh El Ghazal State based in Aweil State Hospital to provide maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) services while assessing the knowledge and skills capacity of national health staff especially midwives, traditional birth attendants, and those providing RH services. I mainly concentrate on providing antenatal care services to pregnant women with normal and problematic pregnancies. It is here that I and colleagues attend to women who come in labor, refer them after establishing that they are in established labor, counsel postnatal mothers, some with their spouses, on the care of their babies. It was during one of such days that I noticed a young woman who had brought her child for immunization. It was already late and we had seen the last client. When I asked her what I could do for her, she looked at me and gave me a big innocent smile that touched my heart. The driver had come to pick me and team for lunch and the temptation to jump in to the vehicle was very strong after a long day’s work with no break due to the large number of clients. Most of the staff had already left and the only other staff with me was the national community midwife (CM) who had already taken her handbag to leave. We asked the client the reason for her coming that late to the clinic (3.00pm) and she responded that she had come from Aweil East county, a distance of 100 kms away from the hospital. I requested the CM to assist me do a quick physical examination of both mother and baby, while I quickly recorded her details. She agreed and within a short time she had checked and given the baby a clean bill of health. The mother’s turn came and the CM explained to her that she needed to examine to ensure that she was fine after delivery. This was done but after 2 minutes, I heard a scream from their direction. It was from the CM who was shocked to see blood flowing from the mother on to the couch and to the floor. I looked and was equally shocked to see blood dripping on the floor. The young mother was bleeding profusely from the birth canal 3 weeks after delivery. I applied emergency interventions in order to save this client’s life. I reassured the CM and the client that the situation was dire but we were going to do all that was possible to arrest the bleeding. On inquiring if she had been accompanied to the clinic by anybody, the client told me that her husband was outside the room. We called him and realized that he was elderly man who was anxious and too shy to approach us as the husband of the young girl. I reassured him that we were going to assist his wife get better. After taking the necessary vital signs and examinations, I referred the client to the maternity unit where she was admitted, given treatment and discharged after 3 days, with much improvement. The fact that I and my colleague attended to the mother and discovered her problem made me understand that had I & the CM not been there at the time this client came in, she would have ended up going home as a ‘missed’ opportunity for postnatal care, most likely to die, after getting her baby immunized. I thanked God for giving us the patience and stamina to ignore our hunger and fatigue, to attend to this client and her baby, and to discover her condition. I feared to imagine how we could have lost that young lady and probably her baby who would most likely follow her soon after her death. Postpartum bleeding is known to be the leading cause of maternal deaths worldwide. This incident made me glad since I saw a confident smile full of respect, on the face of the client’s husband. As I pondered on the man’s gratitude, I realized the importance of volunteerism. I realized that saving that particular client’s life meant that the baby would live as well as the father. This is because a healthy woman is the pillar of her family’s health and development.
The Community midwife also started looking at IUNV midwives with renewed respect and admiration. She pays keen attention on the coaching I and my fellow volunteer give her and the other national clinicians dealing with pregnant and lactating women at the ANC clinic. Word of our volunteering work has spread far and wide into the counties that we are now receiving more pregnant and postnatal women. The ANC clinic is currently registering an average of 2,000 consultations on a monthly basis. Services at the hospital have also improved due to the presence of IUNV midwives as we also capacity build the hospital administration on how to manage the hospital in terms of material, infrastructure and human resources. I have achieved several activity goals since I came here despite the challenges faced. I love the work I do as a volunteer and by the time I leave duty despite the fatigue, I normally retire to bed a contented person when I know that all the clients who came for our assistance received quality care. The other daily activities/responsibilities that I do are:-
1.Coaching the national staff to ensure that they would be in a position to provide quality services long after I and other IUNV midwives are gone.
2.Starting and improving on integrated MCH services despite properly trained staff shortage in the state and the entire country.
3.Imparting knowledge and skills to facility and community health care providers via formal trainings to prepare them to take up the positions we are holding and provide quality care to the community members.
4.Assisting Hospital Director to manage the hospital by working with and on-job training him on areas of identified gaps so as to equip him with the necessary management/administration knowledge and skills.
5.Following up health staff in order to closely monitor their care giving capabilities and give them support as deemed necessary. I do this via supportive supervision and so far I have visited 2 PHCCs and 1 PHCU.
6.I have just completed a five days’ Reproductive Health/Safe Motherhood Initiative training for 25 low level facility and community health staff working in MOH health facilities, in 3 counties out of the five in NBEG State. In order to help individuals, families, communities and countries to achieve and maintain all round development, volunteer action should be embraced and many people encouraged to develop the volunteering spirit and join in this great and very important self giving that not only benefits the host communities but the volunteer her/himself. I have encouraged many colleagues and friends to register for as UNVs and hope that they, too, would join volunteers to enhance sustainable development. Midwives Save lives, Volunteering facilitates that. Long Live Volunteerism!!

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